Froid

Froid is near Medicine Lake and the North Dakota border. One theory is that the name was suggested by division engineer Charles Walker, who selected it from an old map of Nebraska (Perrin).

Froid is a French work meaning "cold" and was no doubt appropriately applied to this spot in northern Montana. Froid, Montana was the home of John W. Schnitzler, whose wheatfields covered thousands of acres, and whose enthusiasm for aviation led to the establishment of an excellent airport at Froid. (from Cheney's Names on the Face of Montana, Mountain Press Publishing Company) The Froid community is very friendly and hospitable. When you walk down the street or into a local business everyone is friendly, eager to help, and sincere. The whole community is involved in local activities. With few large businesses Froid's economy is based on agriculture. The main products in the area are wheat, alfalfa, barley, and beef cattle. Froid is near Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge, which is located on the heavily glaciated rolling plains of northeastern Montana, between the Missouri River and the Canadian Border. Thousands of migrating waterfowl make their summer home at Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Great blue herons, white pelicans, sandhill cranes, grebes and 12 different species of ducks share the prairie lake ecosystem making it a great stop on the Northeastern Plains Birding Trail.

Source:  Visitmt.com

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